Introducing slider: A new way to read on feedly [Updated]

Originally posted on Building Feedly:

Our goal at feedly is to connect readers to the sources of information they love and deliver the best possible reading experience. Based on feedback from many of our readers, we’re launching a new way to read articles in feedly we call the slider view. Here’s how it works and why we’re sure you’ll love it:

The Slider

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When you click on an article in feedly, that content will now appear in a card that slides open from the right edge of your screen.

Easier Reading

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While reading, this makes it super easy to jump back and forth between your list of unread articles and the content you want to read.

Better Navigation

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When you have an article open, the slider article card includes left / right navigation buttons that make it simple for you to quickly page through unread content using your mouse. As always, you can use the…

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The Return Of The Desktop Productivity App

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Sunrise. Evernote. Feedly. Wunderlist. Mailbox.*

Those apps are all an integral part of my personal productivity suite, the tools that I use on a day-to-day basis. Without a desktop version, those mobile clients are useful but not transformative. But with multi-device access, they have become difficult to replace.

I’m not the only user who is seeing the tools he uses for personal productivity shift from some weird mix of web and mobile to increasingly connected apps which live on my smartphone, tablet, and now also my desktop. And that’s reshaping the way developers think about how important the desktop is to their distribution strategy.

Web -> Mobile -> Desktop

For many users, the desktop productivity app probably never fully went away. Anyone who uses Microsoft Exchange for email or calendaring, or Microsoft Word as their word processor, can tell you that those applications remain omnipresent in a number of organizations.

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New: Back up your feedly to Dropbox [Pro]

Originally posted on Building Feedly:

Dropbox Vault

We’re excited to tell you about our latest feedly Pro integration: Dropbox Vault.

Dropbox Vault automatically backs up your tagged and saved articles, and a list of all your feeds (OPML file) to your Dropbox account. We believe that all the valuable data you collect in your feedly belongs to you, and this integration makes it easy for you to export, backup and access that information from wherever you are.

Activate Dropbox Vault

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What gets backed up to my Dropbox account?

All of your Saved for Later articles, tagged articles and a list of the feeds you subscribe to will be backed up to Dropbox…

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iPhone Dev Sessions: Create a Drum App

Originally posted on Gigaom:

BickBoxx-1

You’ve seen all the different drum apps, right? Well, they’re really easy to make. In this iPhone Dev Sessions article, I want to teach you how to make Bickboxx, an actual app that’s in the iTunes App Store.

Grab Bickboxx (FREE) from the iTunes App Store if you want to see this puppy in action so you have an idea of what you’re building. Also, I’ve opened up the source code for free at Github. Feel free to download it, report issues, or even fork your own version and change it as you see fit.

More info on the open-source community project at Bickbot’s Bickboxx page.

Note: You don’t need to download the code from Github to get through the tutorial.

An On-going Project

I plan on adding more tutorials with enhancements to this project. Here are a couple of things that could be featured in future iPhone…

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How to write a minimal WebKit browser in 30 lines of Swift

Originally posted on practicalswift.com:

This article shows how to write a minimal WebKit browser in 30 lines of Swift. This is what the result will look like:

webkit_swift

Now on to the code –

We start with Swift shebang line so that we can run the script directly from the command line without compiling it first (edit-run instead of edit-compile-run):

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We continue by importing WebKit and setting up the application. Every graphical Cocoa application needs one (and only one) instance of NSApplication (or subclass) instantiated, so we start by setting up our NSApplication instance. Then we go ahead by setting the activation policy of this application to “regular” since this is an ordinary app that will appear in the Dock:

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Next up we need a window for our web browser. We create an NSWindow instance of size 800×600 px which we center and then set the title for. After…

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The Washington Post verifies ‘the pause’ in global warming

Originally posted on Watts Up With That?:

Jason Samenow sends word of a new article in WaPo that does some of the same sort of surface temperature analyses we see right here on WUWT. Seeing what a good job Matt Rogers did in his defense against claims of cherry picking, statistical significance woes, and Trenberthian masking, it made me wonder; “How long before he gets called into the chief editors office at WaPo and reassigned to be the correspondent covering Botswana?”


Global warming of the Earth’s surface has decelerated – Matt Rogers, Capital Weather Gang

The recently-released National Climate Assessment (NCA) from the U.S. government offers considerable cause for concern for climate calamity, but downplays the decelerating trend in global surface temperature in the 2000s, which I document here.

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